Once Upon A Time …

Once upon a time there were two sisters,

65736_1473828012933_1450655368_31034411_6728453_n-1

One, two years older than the other and born by a different mother, set her eyes tenderly upon this new creation. As toddler’s, they did not yet understand the magnitude of their situation. They played and laughed when they were in each others presence, and did not, could not, hear the knock of separation at the door.

162643_1463636878161_1450655368_31013799_3012611_n-1

As time went on, their visits happened less and less. Separated by a father that would never quite understand himself or his place, they began going months without being in each others presence. It was difficult to comprehend, with the minds of children, just why they were not allowed to play every single day; why age had set in on the other’s face when a meeting took place.

The younger sister began writing notes to God, whoever he was.

Dear God,  please bring my sister back.

Dear God, why can’t I see my big sister?

Dear God, I miss her.

She cried at night, while looking up at the stars. Her mother tried to comfort her by saying that her big sister was looking at the same star, that very moment. But night after night, the comfort began losing its grip until one cold evening, it left entirely.

196244_1602617712595_1450655368_31264736_2662093_n-1

Nonetheless, when the times came that they could be together, they played and laughed as if no time had passed. They saw themselves in each other, they saw a piece of a puzzle that had been missing. The young one looked up at her older sister with awe and wonder. She idolized her and looked to her as a comfort in the midst of the turmoil going on in her life. The summer sun watched over them at Grandma’s house, and kissed their youthful skin as they played in the forest with dreams that only children could dream.

189643_1602616352561_1450655368_31264731_3801539_n-1

The months turned into years passing without contact. One day, on the bus to school, the younger sister sat staring out the window when someone familiar stepped on. It was her big sister. They saw each other and ran to one another; screaming and yelling, crying and hugging. They vowed, as only a foolish child could, that they would never again be separated. And that one day, when they grew up, they would buy a big house and share it together.

The plan did not work, and they were separated once more. Time began to unravel.

blank-canvas-640-480

And then, suddenly, blank. There were no more get-togethers, no more meet ups. A void wound its way in and around them. The sisters lost contact. They began to lose each other. They began to change; to grow up. Going from children, to teenagers, to adults with lives separate, they did not know one another any longer aside from a few emails here and there.

When the little sister was twenty four, she sold most all of her belongings and left home to fulfill the childhood wish the sisters had once made: they were going to live together. The older sister now had children, and they desperately wanted to connect with one another. Upon reuniting, the distance between them began surfacing quickly. The childish innocence had long since left, and they had grown so very far apart. All of the wishes and effort could not fix what had broken, they were strangers now.

Together, the sisters had become poison to each other; leading one another down a very bad path. It would have led to complete destruction if one had not walked away.

The little sister, knowing that all of their future’s depended on her leaving, said goodbye with a heavy heart. The sister she had dreamt of being with was gone, they both were. The choice was an impossible one, but ultimately the only one that would not destroy her.  The little sister knew that she would take the blame, that although her choice was for everyone’s greater good, she would walk away the bad guy. She ended up being right.

The sister’s lost contact once again.

538686_2876128429567_1261381193_n-1Once upon a time, there were sisters. They frolicked in the summer sun, sharing dreams of a future where they could always be together. But alas, the future came and went, and the dreams disappeared. The two sisters grew up, and they learned that sometimes, dreams are no match for reality.

Advertisements

23 thoughts on “Once Upon A Time …

  1. Reality is no match for dreams! Change is a given and often very uncomfortable but give it time and things will change again. Maybe someday you will find middle ground. How wise you were to know, for the greater good, what needed to be done and have the balls to do it. Keep dreaming new dreams.

  2. I am sorry your dream did not work out the way it was planned, but you can dream a new dream and make that one come true. I have three older sisters and none of them talk to me either. I worked for my oldest sister and her husband for years, he passed away, she changed, and I left the company. Now because of that, no one in my family talks to me. It hurts, but after three years+, I have moved on with my own life with my boyfriend. I can’t dwell in the past, and won’t or it will consume you. Life is like photography, we use our negatives to develop.

  3. I know this, in a different way perhaps, but I know what it is to have to be the bad guy. I know that all the dreaming and romanticism is no match for reality. E-hug.

  4. This story has not ended, there are still many chapters to come and who knows what words will fill them. Words of growing together, leaving the past where it should be, forgiving, finding an adult friendship that both will cherish. At the very least I think there will be mutual respect.

  5. I’m sorry the reconnection did not work out. Sometimes, if you two are very different people, it is hard to reconnect. I don’t know much about you two but someday you will find a friend that you can really connect with and she will be a real sister to you. I hope you find that.

  6. Sorry. This is a really painful post to read. I have a half-brother who is 23 years younger. When he was younger, to the age of about 25 or so, we got along well. His mother died of cancer in 2005 (our last conversation was an argument, typical) and he has essentially ignored me ever since. It is a ridiculous waste.

    I hope you and your sister can reconcile at some point.

  7. Pingback: One Year of Loony « Thoughts of a Lunatic

Thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s